Consider the following sentence. Spot anything wrong here?

“He used to be one of our top sales reps, now he seems to have lost all interest.”

When two independent clauses (i.e. a group of words which could stand alone as complete a sentence) are separated by only a comma, it’s known as a comma splice.

This can be fixed by changing the comma to a semicolon, using a period instead of the comma, or by adding a coordinating conjunction (and, but, so, etc.).

Here’s how a correct version of the above example would look:

“He used to be one of our top sales reps, but now he seems to have lost all interest.”

So, that’s how to spot and deal with a comma splice.

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